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Ethical theory and the good life

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  • Ethical theory and the good life

    What is the best way to live a good and fulfilled life which doesn't commit a naturalistic fallacy?

  • #2
    What do you mean by living a life that doesn't commit the naturalistic fallacy? Are you wondering how one formulates an ethical system that bridges the Humean fact/value distinction?

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    • #3
      Is there such a thing as the naturalistic fallacy? Of course, there are always lazy appeals and assertions, but it seems to me that hiding behind the designation of this alleged fallacy is the assumption of a particular, Humean or positivist metaethical approach.
      Last edited by Jeremy Taylor; 09-06-2019, 11:53 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Jeremy Taylor View Post
        Is there such as the naturalistic fallacy? Of course, there are always lazy appeals and assertions, but it seems to me that hiding behind the designation of this alleged is the assumption of a particular, Humean or positivist metaethical approach.
        I think you're right. The fact/value distinction assumes the materialist-mechanistic model of nature where value is relegated to the realm of secondary qualities, and what is extra-mentally real are only the primary empirical dimensions of reality. This happened with the Aristotelian principle of form and consequently teleology--being seen as conceptual analysis, reflecting only the way the human mind synthesizes reality. Value or the good was no longer enmeshed into reality via a teleological understanding of the world, and so the naturalistic fallacy was born.
        Last edited by RomanJoe; 09-05-2019, 09:05 PM.

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